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Szent István Király Múzeum - Hetedhét Játékmúzeum, Székesfehérvár Könyvtár [MAd/187-2017]

Strickler, Eva - Alookee, Anaoyok: Inuit Dolls Reminders of a Heritage

https://www.museum-digital.de/data/hu/portal/resources/documents/201702/20101846156.pdf (Városi Képtár - Hetedhét Játékmúzeum CC BY-NC-SA)
Provenance/Rights: Városi Képtár - Hetedhét Játékmúzeum (CC BY-NC-SA)

Description

Inuit dolls are made out of soapstone and bone, materials common to the people of northern Alaska, Greendland and Northerm Canada. Many are clothed with animal fur or skin. Thier clothing articulates the traditional stíle of dress necessay to survive cold winters, wind, and snow. Dolls could have been gifts to young Inuit girls, to be used as teaching devies and passing down of culture.
With these dolls, young girls learn various skills necessy for thier survival such as skin preparation, cutting & sewing, proper use of materials, designs and significance of symbols in thieer culture.
Inuit dolls were enjoyed by both young and olnd old Inuit indivisuals and give an excellent insight into Inuit culture.

Measurements

176 p.: ill. fekete-fehér és színes fotók

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Keywords

Object from: Szent István Király Múzeum - Hetedhét Játékmúzeum, Székesfehérvár

A Hetedhét Játékmúzeum Székesfehérvár történelmi belvárosában, a Hiemer-Font-Caraffa épülettömbben található. Állandó kiállítása ...

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[Last update: 2019/07/23]

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